Fall Semester

Duke in New York Fall: Arts & Media is a full, four course Duke semester that immerses you in the cultural, artistic, professional, and personal life of New York City. Through lectures, tours, and coordinating events, the team-taught core courses build a solid basis for a Fall semester that includes lively discussion of books, plays, iconic places, articles, and films.

- FALL COURSES -

ENG 312A The Arts in New York: Core Course Topic

Telling the Story: Fact, Fiction, and Films about New York. ALP, R, W

(Cross listed as PUB POLICY 312A, THEATER STUDIES 213A, VISUAL & MEDIA STUDIES 259AI&E and MMS eligible)

Through lively writing, great films, and compelling art, Telling the Story will introduce you to the history and neighborhoods of New York. It will include some walking tours that allow you to explore the City as an immersive experience. It includes as well as free tickets to plays, concerts, museum shows, and other events that capture the New York vibe and the evolution of the arts and media up to today. 

ALP, R, W.

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ENG 310A Making Media: a Guest Speaker Course

The Business of Art and Media. ALP, STS

(Cross listed as ART HISTORY 313A, VISUAL & MEDIA STUDIES 301A)

The arts and media never just happen. They require contributions from many people: writers, actors, stage managers, arts management staff, musicians, fund-raisers - you name it. Increasingly, all of these professionals use and depend on technology of increasing complexity. Making Media gives students a chance to meet and talk with important people who make the arts and media happen. Guests will discuss what they do, how they interact with society, and the role technology plays in their work. Readings and participation in intense question-and-answer period required. Two short papers plus a final project required. Open only to students in the Duke in New York Arts & Media program. Faculty and staff. One course.

This course may be used as an elective toward the English major. Credit toward other majors and certificates possible with approval by the appropriate DUS.

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ENG 313A Work experience/apprenticeship (for duke credit)

(Cross listed as ART HISTORY 312A, THEATER STUDIES 214A, VISUAL & MEDIA STUDIES 296A; I&E and MMS eligible) 

*** Duke in NY Arts & Media counts towards the I & E certificate, as a part of its experience requirement. The Work Experience / Apprenticeship course (313A) counts towards the MMS Certificate on a case by case basis. 313A also counts as a Duke course credit towards graduation even if you have already taken an internship for credit at Duke. If you wish credit towards your major, please confer with you departmental DUS.*** 

The work experience "course" involves immersion in the professional world through a job in the arts, the nonprofit sector, television, film, or a business that interacts with the arts and media, such as advertising, entertainment law, music production, fashion, public relations, advertising, and events planning. Students are required to work 15 to 20 hours per week; a maximum of 20 hours is strongly recommended. A 10- to 15-page research paper, involving a list of readings submitted early in the semester, is required for Duke credit. Offered only for Duke in New York Arts & Media students. Staff with Prof. Torgovnick available for consultation. One course.

  • Both the Fall & Summer programs have strong relationships with many potential employers: theater from Broadway to off-Broadway; artists in hip Brooklyn; museums like MoMA and the Guggenheim; media from Focus Features to MTV; publishing from Vogue to boutique agencies; businesses from advertising to law to public relations.
  • You find your own internship, but we'll provide tips and contacts along the way. We stay in touch and guide you through a paper that enriches your understanding of the internship experience and satisfies Duke requirements for course credit.

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NOTE: In addition to these required DINY courses, Fall students will also take one elective of their choosing, taught by Duke faculty, such as ENG 390A: Museum as Frame; Eng 390A Theater Now: NYC!; or an approved NYU course by petition.

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fall 2018 elective option 1: ENG 390A THE MUSEUM AS FRAME

(Cross listed as VMS 390A ) 

Faculty Instructor: Prof. Andrew Weinstein

Through class meetings and museum visits, students will investigate the idea of the museum, in particular how the presentation of artworks within a museum framework affects the public reception of the work.

 

FALL 2018 ELECTIVE OPTION 2: Eng 390A Theater Now: NYC!

(Cross listed as MUSIC 239SA, ICS 246SA, TS )

Faculty Instructor: Jeff Storer

Through readings, exercises, and other creative activities, the course will allow you to refine your skills in marketing, management, graphic design / lighting, writing, directing, and acting in an exploration of theater now in New York City.  Some classes will deepen your experience of events we attend in the core seminar-style course. Others will strike out into new territory, 

All will emphasize the collaborative world of theater and roles that also apply to film and tv. 


- HOUSING -

Fall students stay at the St. George Dorm (55 Clark St New York, NY) in cool Northwest Brooklyn. The dorm is within walking distance of Manhattan; the 2 & 3 subway lines are right inside the building, and the A, C, E, N, R, 4 & 5 lines are just a few short blocks away.

MetroCards are provided each month and there is a communal kitchen for cooking meals. The quaint Brooklyn neighborhood includes cozy coffee spots, colorful markets, delicious eateries, yoga studios, shops, a library and river views.

 
                                                                             Fall students in the St. George Dorm

                                                                            Fall students in the St. George Dorm